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Summer-Glau.com Forum » Off Topic » The Water Cooler » The Official Science Thread (Discussions about science related news and discoveries)
The Official Science Thread
FermiDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 1
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Post science related news and discoveries in this thread.

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You can't stop the signal!
 
FermiDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 2
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The energy of an object with rest mass m and speed v is given by the very famous formula:



Where the Lorentz factor is defined as:



Where c is a constant= 299 792 458 m / s the speed of light
If v > c We get a negative value inside of the square root, therefore no physical object can move faster than the speed of light in vacuum.

The Physicist at CERN have now discovered a particle that is moving faster than the speed of light.

The measurements collected over three years showed that the neutrinos (an electrically neutral, subatomic particle) travel at a velocity 20 parts per million above the speed of light.

The Physicist have great confidence in the results and have checked and double checked everything that could distort the measurements.

http://press.web.cern.ch/press....1E.html

How weird is this? Where Einstein wrong

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You can't stop the signal!
 
termi-ninja-torDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 3
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Fermi, this is very interesting.

I am not a physicist, but I am looking forward to confirmation or refutation of this by the larger physics community. I wonder what the implications might be?

By the way, this reminds me of a question that I have had since my high school physics class. Allow me to ask you -- when an electron jumps from one energy level to another, is its transition "instantaneous"? I.e., is it assumed to travel faster than light? Or is my understanding of this too old-fashioned?
 
FermiDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 4
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Quote (termi-ninja-tor)
when an electron jumps from one energy level to another, is its transition "instantaneous"? I.e., is it assumed to travel faster than light?
No but the transistions are essentially instantaneous compared with the time scale of the nuclear motions.


You can't stop the signal!
 
TheSaviorDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 5
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And compared to human time...well, i hope we will see more in the future. Maybe the science will find how is there possible to some of "us" to see in the future, and the scientist will admit that we are not just cells and atoms, but something more, than materia. i hope they will discover the truth, since religion cant do itself, and the man of this new century cant just be reassured by religion or an incomplete science by themselves. we need more. As Ermete Trismegisto said, "as above, so it is below. how is that planet orbit around a sun, so does electrons on their nucleos". we are living in very interesting times...

"This isn't the first time we've done this..."
Cameron

The world is Maya The Illusion. Illusions are the foundation of reality. I am the Lord of Illusions.
Me
 
chrisdvanneDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:44 | Message # 6
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You already know how i usually perceive that type of breaking news wether it be in the pysics or entertainment or gossip department, especially after the first hours of the annoucement. I apply rule number one : "don't believe them" or at least apply a systematic doubt, just like Descartes (1596-1650) tought us.

That said Physics did not end with Einstein and scientist will continue to produce new models; though this is not the case here, the CERN has experiment something that doesn't compute in the model. I like their humple approach of the results and the fact they're asking the community for further confirmation.

James Gillies — head of communications and spokesman for CERN — about the team's results :
Quote
It's important to make clear that nobody is claiming a discovery, or any contradiction with relativity," explained Gillies. "The OPERA experiment has a measurement they can't account for, so they're opening it up for further scrutiny, and hopefully an independent measurement from another lab.

Fermilab scientists, for the United States will soon re-analyze the OPERA team's data; we can expect an update about this information in six months.


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Charley_DixonDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:45 | Message # 7
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Quote (termi-ninja-tor)
I wonder what the implications might be?

First experts from other groups will double check results searching for mistakes or something that was not taken into account. If they find nothing then new independent experiments will be conducted (probably new detectors will be built to do that). If they confirm that neutrinos travel faster than light then theorists will try to explain that and they will suggest another experiments to test their theories.

Actually theorists already have explanations for this result that do not violate currently known laws of physics (e.g. http://www.science20.com/alpha_meme/neutrinos_can_go_faster_light_without_violating_relativity-82950).


Cameron: My brother says if you want to be good at anything, you have to practice every day.
 
Charley_DixonDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:45 | Message # 8
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Quote (termi-ninja-tor)
when an electron jumps from one energy level to another, is its transition "instantaneous"?

No, it's not instantaneous. If my memory serves me well, we even calculated that time when I studied quantum electrodynamics. Unfortunately that was very long time ago and I'm too lazy to try to find those calculations smile


Cameron: My brother says if you want to be good at anything, you have to practice every day.
 
Charley_DixonDate: Thursday, 06 Oct 2011, 16:45 | Message # 9
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I would highly recommend to read this article: http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2011/09/neutrinos-and-the-speed-of-light-a-primer-on-the-cern-study/ to understand what OPERA researches measured and what implications it has.

Cameron: My brother says if you want to be good at anything, you have to practice every day.
 
chrisdvanneDate: Monday, 24 Oct 2011, 10:24 | Message # 10
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I'm sure you already know Actroid-F, a female android tested in some japanese hospitals to observe patients and make them feel comfortable. And now researchers at the National Insitute of Advanced Technology in Tokyo have created the male version, upgraded with camera-eyes.

The funny part is that the female and male robots are the same (even the face); the male version is created with a wig and cosmetics wacko



Quote
meonacid69

has any of them ask for the home address of john connor ?


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chrisdvanneDate: Thursday, 24 Nov 2011, 14:09 | Message # 11
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Will 'Terminator-style' contact lenses become a reality?

Scientists unveil their vision of the future by fitting a contact lens with a rudimentary LED display

Quote (CBS)
Contact lenses take a leap forward with a new technology that projects text and images before your eyes.
The technology works by embedding a custom-made sapphire LED and circular antenna into a plastic contact lens. In the test, a single pixel was controlled by a remote radio frequency transmitting data from the lens.

If you've ever watched a "Terminator" movie, you can imagine how it works. There are endless possibilities for its use, like step-by-step GPS directions or a true virtual reality experience.


Summer Glau as Cameron in TSCC - HUD vision

Source : CBS News


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chrisdvanneDate: Wednesday, 28 Dec 2011, 17:40 | Message # 12
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Old news but there is a picture of Summer Glau as Cameron in TSCC so...

The article, in French, reports that a japanese company called "Cyberdine" (!?!) created an exoskeleton to help the disabled.



CYBERDINE, la révolution a commencé!


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Charley_DixonDate: Saturday, 14 Jan 2012, 15:41 | Message # 13
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I found this article that summarizes recent discoveries in Astronomy: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-01/12/american-astronomical-society-round-up?page=all.

Cameron: My brother says if you want to be good at anything, you have to practice every day.
 
FermiDate: Sunday, 13 Jan 2013, 00:12 | Message # 14
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BIG NEWS!!



Astronomers have discovered a enormous group of quasars that is so large it would take 4 billion years to cross it while traveling at the speed of light.
How awesome is that?

This challenges Albert Einstein's Cosmological Principle, the assumption that the universe looks the same from every point of view.

http://www.reuters.com/article....0130112
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You can't stop the signal!
 
robboDate: Sunday, 13 Jan 2013, 02:03 | Message # 15
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that is super cool just been reading the article on reuters, incredible the way they look at the universe so scientific the astronemers, imagine trying to cross without the speed of light, in theory my maths and scientific knowledge would not be able figure that one out, not sure if it would be possible. must admit it is awesome 4, billion years. wow, smile
 
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